Age of Some of these MD Runners
08/11/2012 5:27:07 PM
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They seems to be getting so young. 3 juniors in the men's 800m final - including 2 medalists and the gold and silver medalist in the 400m. Why are these kids so fast?
They seems to be getting so young. 3 juniors in the men's 800m final - including 2 medalists and the gold and silver medalist in the 400m. Why are these kids so fast?
08/11/2012 8:24:30 PM
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Must be the NCAA - oh, wait !
Must be the NCAA - oh, wait !
08/11/2012 11:02:02 PM
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From what I've read and the numerous bios that I have seen on African runners,it's clear that there is "a culture of running"in their countries,from a very early age,much like hockey in Canada and basketball in the U.S.Successful runners become important people in their country,and every kid knows who they are.These kids start some serious running at a very young age,therefore,by the time they are 15-16 years old,many are running better than college age kids in the rest of the world,and shortly thereafter are competitive on the world stage. It's either that or the NCAA!lol Peace Out......Dr.Heartons
From what I've read and the numerous bios that I have seen on African runners,it's clear that there is "a culture of running"in their countries,from a very early age,much like hockey in Canada and basketball in the U.S.Successful runners become important people in their country,and every kid knows who they are.These kids start some serious running at a very young age,therefore,by the time they are 15-16 years old,many are running better than college age kids in the rest of the world,and shortly thereafter are competitive on the world stage.

It's either that or the NCAA!lol

Peace Out......Dr.Heartons
08/12/2012 9:09:25 AM
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@DrHeartons The 2 400m guys were from the Caribbean.
@DrHeartons

The 2 400m guys were from the Caribbean.
08/12/2012 10:37:43 AM
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@bryano I was thinking of the 800m and up when commenting on the young ages of some of these runners.And of course,we can not forget what is being done in the Caribbean with the sprinters.Usain Bolt,and the same can be said of the great African runners in their respective countries,have a HUGE impact not only with the kids,but their nation as well.Many of these kids start running early because of the impact these runners have. Or maybe it's the NCAA! Peace-----Dr.Heartons
@bryano I was thinking of the 800m and up when commenting on the young ages of some of these runners.And of course,we can not forget what is being done in the Caribbean with the sprinters.Usain Bolt,and the same can be said of the great African runners in their respective countries,have a HUGE impact not only with the kids,but their nation as well.Many of these kids start running early because of the impact these runners have.

Or maybe it's the NCAA!

Peace-----Dr.Heartons
08/12/2012 1:58:18 PM
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[quote=DrHeartons]From what I've read and the numerous bios that I have seen on African runners,it's clear that there is "a culture of running"in their countries,from a very early age,much like hockey in Canada and basketball in the U.S.Successful runners become important people in their country,and every kid knows who they are.These kids start some serious running at a very young age,therefore,by the time they are 15-16 years old,many are running better than college age kids in the rest of the world,and shortly thereafter are competitive on the world stage. It's either that or the NCAA!lol Peace Out......Dr.Heartons[/quote] @DrHeartons You can't be serious. You read the bios and totally believe that their stated age is their real age? Get real. Even in Canada, many of the refugees and immigrants from all parts of the 3rd world have January 1st as their stated birthday. I personally know and ran with a guy who ran at Canadian Junior XC even though he was too old to compete. He was only allowed to run because his permanent resident card said he was 6 months younger than his true age. This doesn`t bother me, but it just proves a point. If we don`t have a clear picture of ages in Canada, what makes you think they do in most parts of Africa? Ask some of our own youth athletes. They were competing against Kenyan runners who were in their [i]20's[/i]. Sure, while there is a huge culture of running in that part of the world, there is also poverty. It is a fact that many of the world youth and world junior competitors ``age dope`` and compete as much younger athletes because of the money and the sponsorship. I would do the same if it meant getting myself out of a life of poverty. While Amos from Botswana is good, do you seriously think this guy ran 1:41 as an 18 year old? 1:41 is good, no matter what age. Do you really think Eliud Kipchoge out-gunned El G AND Bekele at the same age? While there are reasons these athlete have superior performances, they aren't totally based off culture alone. Judging by the performances at these Olympics, it's obvious things have changed. Remember, they still tie their shoes up the same way we do.
DrHeartons wrote:
From what I've read and the numerous bios that I have seen on African runners,it's clear that there is "a culture of running"in their countries,from a very early age,much like hockey in Canada and basketball in the U.S.Successful runners become important people in their country,and every kid knows who they are.These kids start some serious running at a very young age,therefore,by the time they are 15-16 years old,many are running better than college age kids in the rest of the world,and shortly thereafter are competitive on the world stage.

It's either that or the NCAA!lol

Peace Out......Dr.Heartons


@DrHeartons You can't be serious. You read the bios and totally believe that their stated age is their real age? Get real. Even in Canada, many of the refugees and immigrants from all parts of the 3rd world have January 1st as their stated birthday. I personally know and ran with a guy who ran at Canadian Junior XC even though he was too old to compete. He was only allowed to run because his permanent resident card said he was 6 months younger than his true age. This doesn`t bother me, but it just proves a point. If we don`t have a clear picture of ages in Canada, what makes you think they do in most parts of Africa? Ask some of our own youth athletes. They were competing against Kenyan runners who were in their 20's.

Sure, while there is a huge culture of running in that part of the world, there is also poverty. It is a fact that many of the world youth and world junior competitors ``age dope`` and compete as much younger athletes because of the money and the sponsorship. I would do the same if it meant getting myself out of a life of poverty. While Amos from Botswana is good, do you seriously think this guy ran 1:41 as an 18 year old? 1:41 is good, no matter what age. Do you really think Eliud Kipchoge out-gunned El G AND Bekele at the same age?

While there are reasons these athlete have superior performances, they aren't totally based off culture alone. Judging by the performances at these Olympics, it's obvious things have changed. Remember, they still tie their shoes up the same way we do.
08/12/2012 11:38:25 PM
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[quote=gazoo]DrHeartonsFrom what I've read and the numerous bios that I have seen on African runners,it's clear that there is "a culture of running"in their countries,from a very early age,much like hockey in Canada and basketball in the U.S.Successful runners become important people in their country,and every kid knows who they are.These kids start some serious running at a very young age,therefore,by the time they are 15-16 years old,many are running better than college age kids in the rest of the world,and shortly thereafter are competitive on the world stage. It's either that or the NCAA!lol Peace Out......Dr.Heartons @DrHeartons You can't be serious. You read the bios and totally believe that their stated age is their real age? Get real. Even in Canada, many of the refugees and immigrants from all parts of the 3rd world have January 1st as their stated birthday. I personally know and ran with a guy who ran at Canadian Junior XC even though he was too old to compete. He was only allowed to run because his permanent resident card said he was 6 months younger than his true age. This doesn`t bother me, but it just proves a point. If we don`t have a clear picture of ages in Canada, what makes you think they do in most parts of Africa? Ask some of our own youth athletes. They were competing against Kenyan runners who were in their 20's. Sure, while there is a huge culture of running in that part of the world, there is also poverty. It is a fact that many of the world youth and world junior competitors ``age dope`` and compete as much younger athletes because of the money and the sponsorship. I would do the same if it meant getting myself out of a life of poverty. While Amos from Botswana is good, do you seriously think this guy ran 1:41 as an 18 year old? 1:41 is good, no matter what age. Do you really think Eliud Kipchoge out-gunned El G AND Bekele at the same age? While there are reasons these athlete have superior performances, they aren't totally based off culture alone. Judging by the performances at these Olympics, it's obvious things have changed. Remember, they still tie their shoes up the same way we do.[/quote] @gazoo I apologise if I gave the impression that I "totally believe "that the stated ages are their real ages. I really don't know what their real ages are,and have no foolproof way of knowing one way or the other. I hope that clears that up.And if I have not made myself clear on that point now,it's a colossal failure on my part to convey my thoughts clearly ,or, you are stupid.I think it's the latter.But I could be wrong,and if I am,I apologise to you. And this is the second time that you mentioned that they "still tie their shoes up the same way we do".Really?I always thought they had an extra hand that popped out of their ass or something!I better check their bios again! I love you gazoo....keep em coming....Dr.Heartons
gazoo wrote:
DrHeartonsFrom what I've read and the numerous bios that I have seen on African runners,it's clear that there is "a culture of running"in their countries,from a very early age,much like hockey in Canada and basketball in the U.S.Successful runners become important people in their country,and every kid knows who they are.These kids start some serious running at a very young age,therefore,by the time they are 15-16 years old,many are running better than college age kids in the rest of the world,and shortly thereafter are competitive on the world stage.

It's either that or the NCAA!lol

Peace Out......Dr.Heartons

@DrHeartons You can't be serious. You read the bios and totally believe that their stated age is their real age? Get real. Even in Canada, many of the refugees and immigrants from all parts of the 3rd world have January 1st as their stated birthday. I personally know and ran with a guy who ran at Canadian Junior XC even though he was too old to compete. He was only allowed to run because his permanent resident card said he was 6 months younger than his true age. This doesn`t bother me, but it just proves a point. If we don`t have a clear picture of ages in Canada, what makes you think they do in most parts of Africa? Ask some of our own youth athletes. They were competing against Kenyan runners who were in their 20's.

Sure, while there is a huge culture of running in that part of the world, there is also poverty. It is a fact that many of the world youth and world junior competitors ``age dope`` and compete as much younger athletes because of the money and the sponsorship. I would do the same if it meant getting myself out of a life of poverty. While Amos from Botswana is good, do you seriously think this guy ran 1:41 as an 18 year old? 1:41 is good, no matter what age. Do you really think Eliud Kipchoge out-gunned El G AND Bekele at the same age?

While there are reasons these athlete have superior performances, they aren't totally based off culture alone. Judging by the performances at these Olympics, it's obvious things have changed. Remember, they still tie their shoes up the same way we do.


@gazoo I apologise if I gave the impression that I "totally believe "that the stated ages are their real ages. I really don't know what their real ages are,and have no foolproof way of knowing one way or the other.

I hope that clears that up.And if I have not made myself clear on that point now,it's a colossal failure on my part to convey my thoughts clearly ,or, you are stupid.I think it's the latter.But I could be wrong,and if I am,I apologise to you.

And this is the second time that you mentioned that they "still tie their shoes up the same way we do".Really?I always thought they had an extra hand that popped out of their ass or something!I better check their bios again!

I love you gazoo....keep em coming....Dr.Heartons
08/14/2012 2:21:20 PM
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@gazoo looking at a person like Nijel Amos....I realize some people lie about their age because of false certificates but strictly looking at Amos, I believe he is a junior. From the immaturity in his face, to the under development of his body, to his stride and form. He straight up looks and acts like a young runner that is very unpolished. His arms are wild, he face shows the stress of panic in certain situations.....I'll be the first to say that some Juniors are not Juniors, but I dont believe Amos is one of those people screwing the system. I give all credit to him and am excited to see his growth in the sport.
@gazoo

looking at a person like Nijel Amos....I realize some people lie about their age because of false certificates but strictly looking at Amos, I believe he is a junior. From the immaturity in his face, to the under development of his body, to his stride and form. He straight up looks and acts like a young runner that is very unpolished. His arms are wild, he face shows the stress of panic in certain situations.....I'll be the first to say that some Juniors are not Juniors, but I dont believe Amos is one of those people screwing the system. I give all credit to him and am excited to see his growth in the sport.
08/14/2012 6:13:36 PM
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@kingwwc I don't question his age but question how a guy that young and with the poor form that he has can run 1:41.73. I'm sorry to be that skeptical, but there are just too many 18 yr olds running fast 800s all of a sudden for me not to have my eyebrows up. Maybe all this talent just hit the scene all at the same time when for years, not even senior athletes could run these times. In 2004, the average age of the 800m finalists was 30. In 2012, the average age was 19.7. Even World Youths last year had 3 under 1:45.
@kingwwc

I don't question his age but question how a guy that young and with the poor form that he has can run 1:41.73. I'm sorry to be that skeptical, but there are just too many 18 yr olds running fast 800s all of a sudden for me not to have my eyebrows up. Maybe all this talent just hit the scene all at the same time when for years, not even senior athletes could run these times. In 2004, the average age of the 800m finalists was 30. In 2012, the average age was 19.7.

Even World Youths last year had 3 under 1:45.
08/14/2012 7:11:39 PM
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What do you think is happening, Bryano?
What do you think is happening, Bryano?
08/14/2012 8:52:18 PM
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You should know the answer to this traveller:It's the NCAA! Dr.Heartons
You should know the answer to this traveller:It's the NCAA!

Dr.Heartons
08/14/2012 9:17:20 PM
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@traveller Maybe nothing is going on, Travellor. I have no idea, but I know, as you do, how hard it is to get runners under 1:49, never mind under 1:43.
@traveller

Maybe nothing is going on, Travellor. I have no idea, but I know, as you do, how hard it is to get runners under 1:49, never mind under 1:43.
08/14/2012 9:45:46 PM
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@bryano Did you ever train a sub 1:48 guy? What kind of 400 could they run? What age did they set their PB?
@bryano

Did you ever train a sub 1:48 guy? What kind of 400 could they run? What age did they set their PB?
08/14/2012 9:57:36 PM
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I really don't know how so many young guys are all of a sudden running so fast over 800 metres. Obviously, there's some incredible talent there. I have no idea what their coaching or "medical" situations are, but I know how great an athlete it takes to run sub 1:45, even a fully mature athlete. To think that a sub 1:43 is now required to be competitive as a Junior...wow! Of course, there is the secret NCAA competition, without which success is not possible ;)
I really don't know how so many young guys are all of a sudden running so fast over 800 metres. Obviously, there's some incredible talent there. I have no idea what their coaching or "medical" situations are, but I know how great an athlete it takes to run sub 1:45, even a fully mature athlete. To think that a sub 1:43 is now required to be competitive as a Junior...wow!
Of course, there is the secret NCAA competition, without which success is not possible ;)
08/15/2012 2:23:08 PM
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@bryano I think pretty simply put, Rudisha happened. When he came on the scene he really changed the face of the 800m. The event was always known as a strong, wise mans race and Rudisha(not that he's not wise now) changed that. From people looking up to a younger success, to the national focus of african countries putting more thought into sprints than soley distance events, to the many factors that influenced the outcomes. I think their is something wrong with society for whenever something happens our first thought is "something illegal or not fair" is happening. The sport is changing and will continue to change at various unknown intervals. Its actually the beauty of the sport. Its the same way Bolt changed everything when a long, tall, middle distance looking runner was smashing the world record in the 100 and 200 events. Our sport is beautifully unpredictable and thats what makes it so exciting to watch and be a part of!
@bryano

I think pretty simply put, Rudisha happened. When he came on the scene he really changed the face of the 800m. The event was always known as a strong, wise mans race and Rudisha(not that he's not wise now) changed that. From people looking up to a younger success, to the national focus of african countries putting more thought into sprints than soley distance events, to the many factors that influenced the outcomes. I think their is something wrong with society for whenever something happens our first thought is "something illegal or not fair" is happening. The sport is changing and will continue to change at various unknown intervals. Its actually the beauty of the sport. Its the same way Bolt changed everything when a long, tall, middle distance looking runner was smashing the world record in the 100 and 200 events. Our sport is beautifully unpredictable and thats what makes it so exciting to watch and be a part of!
08/15/2012 3:27:14 PM
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I don't think anyone is saying someone wrong or illegal is happening. I hear people questioning the possibilities, and opening them for discussion. As for me, it still boggles the mind that relatively unknown teenagers can all of a sudden rip huge chunks off their PB's, and in so doing, pass over many of the legends of our sport, who were great athletes, and raced and trained for many years to achieve their ultimate times. I'm interested to see what these guys will be running 2 or 3 years from now.
I don't think anyone is saying someone wrong or illegal is happening. I hear people questioning the possibilities, and opening them for discussion. As for me, it still boggles the mind that relatively unknown teenagers can all of a sudden rip huge chunks off their PB's, and in so doing, pass over many of the legends of our sport, who were great athletes, and raced and trained for many years to achieve their ultimate times. I'm interested to see what these guys will be running 2 or 3 years from now.
08/15/2012 5:06:31 PM
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@petesakes Just one under 1:48. He was more of a 400/800 guy 47.40 400 pb 3:52 1500 pb on very little distance at 22 years of age; maybe 30 mpw max. i wish I could have talked him into training and increasing his distance for a few more years. He had trained for 3 - 7 years at a high level and my goal with all of them was/is to move to 1500m. I realize there are some very talented kids around but I wonder how they can build up to be able to run sub 1:44 at such a young age. And the other interesting aspect is that these guys are popping up all over in the past 2 years.
@petesakes

Just one under 1:48. He was more of a 400/800 guy 47.40 400 pb 3:52 1500 pb on very little distance at 22 years of age; maybe 30 mpw max. i wish I could have talked him into training and increasing his distance for a few more years.

He had trained for 3 - 7 years at a high level and my goal with all of them was/is to move to 1500m.

I realize there are some very talented kids around but I wonder how they can build up to be able to run sub 1:44 at such a young age. And the other interesting aspect is that these guys are popping up all over in the past 2 years.
08/15/2012 5:08:54 PM
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[quote=kingwwc]@bryano I think pretty simply put, Rudisha happened. When he came on the scene he really changed the face of the 800m. The event was always known as a strong, wise mans race and Rudisha(not that he's not wise now) changed that. From people looking up to a younger success, to the national focus of african countries putting more thought into sprints than soley distance events, to the many factors that influenced the outcomes. I think their is something wrong with society for whenever something happens our first thought is "something illegal or not fair" is happening. The sport is changing and will continue to change at various unknown intervals. Its actually the beauty of the sport. Its the same way Bolt changed everything when a long, tall, middle distance looking runner was smashing the world record in the 100 and 200 events. Our sport is beautifully unpredictable and thats what makes it so exciting to watch and be a part of![/quote] @kingwwc You could be right here. Whereas African kids all wanted to be 5000m runners before, maybe now they are looking down to the 800m more.
kingwwc wrote:
@bryano

I think pretty simply put, Rudisha happened. When he came on the scene he really changed the face of the 800m. The event was always known as a strong, wise mans race and Rudisha(not that he's not wise now) changed that. From people looking up to a younger success, to the national focus of african countries putting more thought into sprints than soley distance events, to the many factors that influenced the outcomes. I think their is something wrong with society for whenever something happens our first thought is "something illegal or not fair" is happening. The sport is changing and will continue to change at various unknown intervals. Its actually the beauty of the sport. Its the same way Bolt changed everything when a long, tall, middle distance looking runner was smashing the world record in the 100 and 200 events. Our sport is beautifully unpredictable and thats what makes it so exciting to watch and be a part of!


@kingwwc

You could be right here. Whereas African kids all wanted to be 5000m runners before, maybe now they are looking down to the 800m more.

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