How Do we Improve Distance Running in Canada?
07/24/2012 3:51:02 PM
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Can we get shoe sponsorship $ up here? Or does NIKE only care about US training groups. Canadians buy running shoes also don't they? Do we need to try to quit relying on centralized government money (Athletics Canada) and learn to be more entrepreneurial? Will a renaissance come from concentrating on the track or on the road? Or do we just throw all our talented runners at the United States and forget about them? (They'll come back)
Can we get shoe sponsorship $ up here? Or does NIKE only care about US training groups. Canadians buy running shoes also don't they?

Do we need to try to quit relying on centralized government money (Athletics Canada) and learn to be more entrepreneurial?

Will a renaissance come from concentrating on the track or on the road?

Or do we just throw all our talented runners at the United States and forget about them? (They'll come back)
07/25/2012 5:57:10 PM
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Why won't these threads just die... P.s. When in doubt, ask yourself, "What would Guelph do?"
Why won't these threads just die...

P.s. When in doubt, ask yourself, "What would Guelph do?"
07/25/2012 7:51:47 PM
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Or, what did the B.C. Centre do, back in the day?
Or, what did the B.C. Centre do, back in the day?
07/26/2012 9:01:43 AM
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Did you know that Canada and the UK are two of the only countries who give "carding" money? Americans don't get any. Europeans don't. Money is not the problem. It's people who think that money is what is holding them back. They are their own problem.
Did you know that Canada and the UK are two of the only countries who give "carding" money? Americans don't get any. Europeans don't. Money is not the problem. It's people who think that money is what is holding them back. They are their own problem.
07/26/2012 2:01:07 PM
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John..... Europe has a club system which offers some sort of infrastructure for athletes to develop. Many other nation's govts do support athletes, but I would argue an infrastrcuture ( the word I have used is centrifugal force) that attracts athletes.....not a system that forces but rather one that has the athlete make the choice.....that way they commit.... Back in the day here in bc that's to be what seemed to smake things so good..... You had centers, but athletes had options of coaches/groups ( egs valley royals, kayaks and Victoria.) .....now the options are limited. You would have athletes who would actively get other athletes to come out and you had athletes who would show up to train for periods of time or permanently. In the end it was...I would argue what dst has done is exactly what was going on in bc 20+ years ago....A system was there but it was the athletes who made the decisions.....
John.....

Europe has a club system which offers some sort of infrastructure for athletes to develop. Many other nation's govts do support athletes, but I would argue an infrastrcuture ( the word I have used is centrifugal force) that attracts athletes.....not a system that forces but rather one that has the athlete make the choice.....that way they commit....

Back in the day here in bc that's to be what seemed to smake things so good..... You had centers, but athletes had options of coaches/groups ( egs valley royals, kayaks and Victoria.) .....now the options are limited.

You would have athletes who would actively get other athletes to come out and you had athletes who would show up to train for periods of time or permanently. In the end it was...I would argue what dst has done is exactly what was going on in bc 20+ years ago....A system was there but it was the athletes who made the decisions.....
07/26/2012 4:12:00 PM
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@bomba That's the question. Do we always need to follow the American NCAA system? If McBride was living in Ethiopia or Kenya (or Botswana), I believe he would be earmarked for the 800m. Amos ran 1:47 last year at Juniors and then trained full time to now be one of the favorites for the Olympics. Someone would (should) sponsor him as a first year junior and he would train full time to see if he could achieve glory in that event (see Amos, Rotich, Aman). They don't all try to go to the US to get scholarships. Many realize there is money to be made in trying all out to be great. You can go to school later. In hockey, many Canadian kids choose this route (Major Junior) rather than college and for many it pays off. For those that don't make it, they can then go to school later. In other words, I'm saying more need to go for it earlier. Especially in the 800m this is true as it is becoming a young man's event.
@bomba

That's the question. Do we always need to follow the American NCAA system? If McBride was living in Ethiopia or Kenya (or Botswana), I believe he would be earmarked for the 800m. Amos ran 1:47 last year at Juniors and then trained full time to now be one of the favorites for the Olympics. Someone would (should) sponsor him as a first year junior and he would train full time to see if he could achieve glory in that event (see Amos, Rotich, Aman). They don't all try to go to the US to get scholarships. Many realize there is money to be made in trying all out to be great. You can go to school later.

In hockey, many Canadian kids choose this route (Major Junior) rather than college and for many it pays off. For those that don't make it, they can then go to school later. In other words, I'm saying more need to go for it earlier.

Especially in the 800m this is true as it is becoming a young man's event.
07/26/2012 8:54:53 PM
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I'll bite. IMO the answer to improving distance running here in Canada is three-fold i) Group Structure: Having a group of guys/girls training together is incredibly motivating. Pair this with a good coach and you have a recipe for success. I could list a number of groups but Bomba has already done that. ii) Marketing: Track is just not that entertaining to watch if you don't understand the sport. You can't sell the public on some guy running 58 400's. for a mile. They have no idea what that means. You need to highlight what it took for that guy to get to those 58's and the fact that you don't need $1000 worth of equipment just to play. Its an inspiring notion-here is a guy that went out with nothing but the shoes on his feet and did something great. Its an advertising campaign that has far-reaching capabilities for a number of companies outside of just shoe companies. On a similar note: distance athletes don't have a personality. Bolt is so popular because he has a fun and infectious demeanor. You want him to win. If you are looking for a local example look at Rob Watson's blog. You can garner an insight into his personality and understand who he is. That allows you to get behind him. I personally enjoy reading Watson's blog more than anyone else's for this very reason. It seems that there are only two ways to brand yourself as a track athlete: Either you have that outgoing personality people can get behind or you are the introvert who trains his ass off on the trails at 6am in order to reach his dreams (Note: this only works for a Cam Levins type-its flaw is that it requires some measure of success beforehand which is a catch 22 in of itself) iii) Money: This part is addressed in ii) but it goes without saying that there needs to be some sort of support system behind you. I could get more specific (sponsorship rules for example) but I think this gives everyone a broad idea
I'll bite. IMO the answer to improving distance running here in Canada is three-fold
i) Group Structure: Having a group of guys/girls training together is incredibly motivating. Pair this with a good coach and you have a recipe for success. I could list a number of groups but Bomba has already done that.

ii) Marketing: Track is just not that entertaining to watch if you don't understand the sport. You can't sell the public on some guy running 58 400's. for a mile. They have no idea what that means. You need to highlight what it took for that guy to get to those 58's and the fact that you don't need $1000 worth of equipment just to play. Its an inspiring notion-here is a guy that went out with nothing but the shoes on his feet and did something great. Its an advertising campaign that has far-reaching capabilities for a number of companies outside of just shoe companies. On a similar note: distance athletes don't have a personality. Bolt is so popular because he has a fun and infectious demeanor. You want him to win. If you are looking for a local example look at Rob Watson's blog. You can garner an insight into his personality and understand who he is. That allows you to get behind him. I personally enjoy reading Watson's blog more than anyone else's for this very reason. It seems that there are only two ways to brand yourself as a track athlete: Either you have that outgoing personality people can get behind or you are the introvert who trains his ass off on the trails at 6am in order to reach his dreams (Note: this only works for a Cam Levins type-its flaw is that it requires some measure of success beforehand which is a catch 22 in of itself)

iii) Money: This part is addressed in ii) but it goes without saying that there needs to be some sort of support system behind you.

I could get more specific (sponsorship rules for example) but I think this gives everyone a broad idea
07/26/2012 9:17:53 PM
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Continue with the minor track program and use the LTAD table with caution.
Continue with the minor track program and use the LTAD table with caution.
07/26/2012 9:59:18 PM
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@ESS92 Yes, I thought about Levins and how interesting his story might be - especially in BC where he is from. Not great in high school, super high mileage, and then success. The problem is that someone needs to develop the story. Instead we read and hear numerous articles wondering who Luongo will be traded for. The other problem with distance runners is that nobody is impressed when you say he came 9th in the Olympics. In North America sports is something that you either win or lose at. The US has a little bit more of a sub-group following due to a more developed HS and College system.
@ESS92

Yes, I thought about Levins and how interesting his story might be - especially in BC where he is from. Not great in high school, super high mileage, and then success. The problem is that someone needs to develop the story. Instead we read and hear numerous articles wondering who Luongo will be traded for. The other problem with distance runners is that nobody is impressed when you say he came 9th in the Olympics. In North America sports is something that you either win or lose at.

The US has a little bit more of a sub-group following due to a more developed HS and College system.
07/26/2012 10:33:13 PM
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[quote=bomba]John..... Europe has a club system which offers some sort of infrastructure for athletes to develop. Many other nation's govts do support athletes, but I would argue an infrastrcuture ( the word I have used is centrifugal force) that attracts athletes.....not a system that forces but rather one that has the athlete make the choice.....that way they commit.... Back in the day here in bc that's to be what seemed to smake things so good..... You had centers, but athletes had options of coaches/groups ( egs valley royals, kayaks and Victoria.) .....now the options are limited. You would have athletes who would actively get other athletes to come out and you had athletes who would show up to train for periods of time or permanently. In the end it was...I would argue what dst has done is exactly what was going on in bc 20+ years ago....A system was there but it was the athletes who made the decisions.....[/quote] @bomba Right, but it's not money. It's will. Maybe more money=more will, but I think it's the other way around. Sure, it makes sense for the federations and branches to help, that's their purpose. But just because people disagree with the way they help, does not mean they are not helpful. People talk about Guelph: they are doing exactly what you describe above.
bomba wrote:
John.....

Europe has a club system which offers some sort of infrastructure for athletes to develop. Many other nation's govts do support athletes, but I would argue an infrastrcuture ( the word I have used is centrifugal force) that attracts athletes.....not a system that forces but rather one that has the athlete make the choice.....that way they commit....

Back in the day here in bc that's to be what seemed to smake things so good..... You had centers, but athletes had options of coaches/groups ( egs valley royals, kayaks and Victoria.) .....now the options are limited.

You would have athletes who would actively get other athletes to come out and you had athletes who would show up to train for periods of time or permanently. In the end it was...I would argue what dst has done is exactly what was going on in bc 20+ years ago....A system was there but it was the athletes who made the decisions.....


@bomba Right, but it's not money. It's will. Maybe more money=more will, but I think it's the other way around. Sure, it makes sense for the federations and branches to help, that's their purpose. But just because people disagree with the way they help, does not mean they are not helpful. People talk about Guelph: they are doing exactly what you describe above.
07/26/2012 11:15:07 PM
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Well it's wasn't specific government money thrown at the athletes but it was indirectly. The sport from a coaching aspect did have more centre coaches....as funding went a down so did the calibre of incentives for coaches to look beyond who was paying the bills.....egs universities. The clubs could then afford to puta morae money intao the athletes as opposed tao coaches. As of a right now in BC only Victoria is paid as a centre.... But there was also the force of politics and personality such as Doug clement (who was moving outa of coaching). In a that respects someone like Doug didn't need the job....he made far more money in his other profession but intrsinsically wanted to see things/athletes succeed.... Once again I would put dst in this intrinsic aspect but he was also driven and smart enough to create something.....the fact that he was in Victoria during the Latter stages of the BC 'glory days' is beyond mere coincidence.... Maybe like the athlete he coach also needs to be extremely intrinsic?????
Well it's wasn't specific government money thrown at the athletes but it was indirectly. The sport from a coaching aspect did have more centre coaches....as funding went a down so did the calibre of incentives for coaches to look beyond who was paying the bills.....egs universities. The clubs could then afford to puta morae money intao the athletes as opposed tao coaches. As of a right now in BC only Victoria is paid as a centre....

But there was also the force of politics and personality such as Doug clement (who was moving outa of coaching). In a that respects someone like Doug didn't need the job....he made far more money in his other profession but intrsinsically wanted to see things/athletes succeed.... Once again I would put dst in this intrinsic aspect but he was also driven and smart enough to create something.....the fact that he was in Victoria during the
Latter stages of the BC 'glory days' is beyond mere coincidence....

Maybe like the athlete he coach also needs to be extremely intrinsic?????
07/27/2012 12:07:21 AM
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DST will tell you the elements of his "vision", and where they originated, it's no big secret, and it's not brand new, just old stuff done very well again! P.S. It does not include just letting our top juniors go to the States, because we can't help them anyways, or other similar bullshit. As I may have mentioned too often, I can't believe anyone is surprised that many of our best kids are going to Guelph!
DST will tell you the elements of his "vision", and where they originated, it's no big secret, and it's not brand new, just old stuff done very well again! P.S. It does not include just letting our top juniors go to the States, because we can't help them anyways, or other similar bullshit. As I may have mentioned too often, I can't believe anyone is surprised that many of our best kids are going to Guelph!
07/27/2012 8:36:25 PM
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I believe we need to find ways to get more young athletes involved in track - with their school and joining clubs. I don't know what it's like in other parts of Canada but where I grew up high school track is practically dead now and there're far fewer decent young runners coming out of the area. It doesn't help that the training facilities are so poor. The area has gone from 3 running tracks to 1 in the last few years and many of the open grass sports fields used for cross-country training are now enclosed by fencing.
I believe we need to find ways to get more young athletes involved in track - with their school and joining clubs. I don't know what it's like in other parts of Canada but where I grew up high school track is practically dead now and there're far fewer decent young runners coming out of the area. It doesn't help that the training facilities are so poor. The area has gone from 3 running tracks to 1 in the last few years and many of the open grass sports fields used for cross-country training are now enclosed by fencing.
07/28/2012 8:29:22 PM
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[quote=bryano]@ESS92 Yes, I thought about Levins and how interesting his story might be - especially in BC where he is from. Not great in high school, super high mileage, and then success. The problem is that [b]someone needs to develop the story[/b]. Instead we read and hear numerous articles wondering who Luongo will be traded for. The other problem with distance runners is that nobody is impressed when you say he came 9th in the Olympics. In North America sports is something that you either win or lose at. The US has a little bit more of a sub-group following due to a more developed HS and College system.[/quote] @bryano This is a good point and the model that we should be looking at is the athlete/agent relationship seen in mass market sports. In order to increase your marketability you need someone to pitch you to the private sector. Now, you could do this yourself much like Nick Symmonds did or you could have a dedicated professional doing it for you just like anyone would use a lawyer for example. Someone correct me if I am wrong but as I understand it, shoe companies require a great deal of exclusivity relative to the amount they pay out when they sign an athlete. This exclusivity hurts the earning potential of athletes. I would argue that except for the most extreme cases, a greater number of smaller sponsorship deals would be more valuable than one average deal from a large shoe sponsor. Collectivize a group of athletes to incentive the agent to actually work hard at it (as 3-5% of 20-30k a year is not going to get him off the couch)and you have the potential to do well. All that aside for the moment I don't know what is wrong with working and training. I could understand if you were working 60hrs a week or if you did manual labour but what about a 9-5pm office job? You can still train at a fairly high level (Drayton did run 2'10 while working full time) and you would never have to worry about money (to an extent). At the end of the day you can't expect a company to sponsor your "potential" in a very intrinsic sport when there are better returns elsewhere
bryano wrote:
@ESS92

Yes, I thought about Levins and how interesting his story might be - especially in BC where he is from. Not great in high school, super high mileage, and then success. The problem is that someone needs to develop the story. Instead we read and hear numerous articles wondering who Luongo will be traded for. The other problem with distance runners is that nobody is impressed when you say he came 9th in the Olympics. In North America sports is something that you either win or lose at.

The US has a little bit more of a sub-group following due to a more developed HS and College system.


@bryano

This is a good point and the model that we should be looking at is the athlete/agent relationship seen in mass market sports. In order to increase your marketability you need someone to pitch you to the private sector. Now, you could do this yourself much like Nick Symmonds did or you could have a dedicated professional doing it for you just like anyone would use a lawyer for example. Someone correct me if I am wrong but as I understand it, shoe companies require a great deal of exclusivity relative to the amount they pay out when they sign an athlete. This exclusivity hurts the earning potential of athletes. I would argue that except for the most extreme cases, a greater number of smaller sponsorship deals would be more valuable than one average deal from a large shoe sponsor. Collectivize a group of athletes to incentive the agent to actually work hard at it (as 3-5% of 20-30k a year is not going to get him off the couch)and you have the potential to do well.

All that aside for the moment I don't know what is wrong with working and training. I could understand if you were working 60hrs a week or if you did manual labour but what about a 9-5pm office job? You can still train at a fairly high level (Drayton did run 2'10 while working full time) and you would never have to worry about money (to an extent). At the end of the day you can't expect a company to sponsor your "potential" in a very intrinsic sport when there are better returns elsewhere
07/29/2012 3:16:31 PM
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The way to get kids more involved in running would require at least two things, both would be supported by a paradigm shift or an epiphany by Ministries of Education. Running should be considered the foundation to general fitness for all sports. All coaching organizations for all sports should require running, not as punishment, but as a ways to make the athlete better. Also, grades should be weighted higher in Phys Ed and running should be a big part of it. That'll motivate some kids. It is not whether there is sufficient talent in this country or not. This is not the question. There are champions everywhere. What we need is a great percentage of the kids to discover running and to stick with it. I have coached as young as elementary school age and we had as many as half the school population running. By the time they are 16, there is a handful....
The way to get kids more involved in running would require at least two things, both would be supported by a paradigm shift or an epiphany by Ministries of Education.

Running should be considered the foundation to general fitness for all sports.

All coaching organizations for all sports should require running, not as punishment, but as a ways to make the athlete better.

Also, grades should be weighted higher in Phys Ed and running should be a big part of it.

That'll motivate some kids.

It is not whether there is sufficient talent in this country or not. This is not the question. There are champions everywhere. What we need is a great percentage of the kids to discover running and to stick with it.

I have coached as young as elementary school age and we had as many as half the school population running. By the time they are 16, there is a handful....
07/29/2012 6:28:09 PM
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[quote=traveller]DST will tell you the elements of his "vision", and where they originated, it's no big secret, and it's not brand new, just old stuff done very well again! P.S. It does not include just letting our top juniors go to the States, because we can't help them anyways, or other similar bullshit. As I may have mentioned too often, I can't believe anyone is surprised that many of our best kids are going to Guelph![/quote] @traveller Anyone who is actually, in the real world, trying to challenge Guelph will tell you that replicating what DST has done in Guelph is far more complicated than you suggest, not least because of the existence of Guelph itself. When DST began to develop his program in Guelph, there was no [i]already existing[/i] program running light years ahead of everyone else (not to say what he was able to do was not extremely impressive). There simply aren't enough serious athletes coming out of the grass roots in this country to replicate what DST has done in Guelph in many other places in the country, and that's even if we could convince our universities to buy in before we actually had the goods to deliver (it's chicken-and-egg here). In the meantime, Guelph will remain the default choice for stay-at-home juniors (again, those who have special reasons to stay, and can afford to), leaving less proven or serious talent for everyone else to work with. And, again, no one is "letting" our to juniors go south anymore than other CIS schools are "letting" them choose Guelph; they are doing both because it makes perfect sense for them as individuals; and, as I tried to explain to you an others in the other thread, it [i]does not hurt[/i] Canadian running that they do so; it only hurts the feelings of some Canadian [i]coaches[/i]. Try to imagine for a moment what would happen to Canadian running if there was suddenly no NCAA option and no Guelph? Guelph cannot accommodate all of our top juniors, and the rest of the CIS could not at the moment, and for the foreseeable future, do for the runners now at Guelph what Guelph is able to do for them in terms of a deeply entrenched elite system. The longer term problem is to develop a better youth and junior development system so that the [i]pool of serious, committed athletes is bigger in general[/i], creating more athletes with the potential to make a go of it in the NCAAA, and enabling those of us who are not Guelph to begin challenging it a little more seriously, by developing the athletes we get. In this thread as in the other, your bluster does little to address any real issue. If you want to, and think you can, develop a program that can rival Guelph and keep the Brandon McBrides of the world from going to the NCAA, why don't you just do it? In other words, show, don't tell (and you haven't even told, beyond ranting in general about Guelph).
raveller wrote:
DST will tell you the elements of his "vision", and where they originated, it's no big secret, and it's not brand new, just old stuff done very well again! P.S. It does not include just letting our top juniors go to the States, because we can't help them anyways, or other similar bullshit. As I may have mentioned too often, I can't believe anyone is surprised that many of our best kids are going to Guelph!


@traveller Anyone who is actually, in the real world, trying to challenge Guelph will tell you that replicating what DST has done in Guelph is far more complicated than you suggest, not least because of the existence of Guelph itself. When DST began to develop his program in Guelph, there was no already existing program running light years ahead of everyone else (not to say what he was able to do was not extremely impressive). There simply aren't enough serious athletes coming out of the grass roots in this country to replicate what DST has done in Guelph in many other places in the country, and that's even if we could convince our universities to buy in before we actually had the goods to deliver (it's chicken-and-egg here). In the meantime, Guelph will remain the default choice for stay-at-home juniors (again, those who have special reasons to stay, and can afford to), leaving less proven or serious talent for everyone else to work with. And, again, no one is "letting" our to juniors go south anymore than other CIS schools are "letting" them choose Guelph; they are doing both because it makes perfect sense for them as individuals; and, as I tried to explain to you an others in the other thread, it does not hurt Canadian running that they do so; it only hurts the feelings of some Canadian coaches. Try to imagine for a moment what would happen to Canadian running if there was suddenly no NCAA option and no Guelph? Guelph cannot accommodate all of our top juniors, and the rest of the CIS could not at the moment, and for the foreseeable future, do for the runners now at Guelph what Guelph is able to do for them in terms of a deeply entrenched elite system. The longer term problem is to develop a better youth and junior development system so that the pool of serious, committed athletes is bigger in general, creating more athletes with the potential to make a go of it in the NCAAA, and enabling those of us who are not Guelph to begin challenging it a little more seriously, by developing the athletes we get.

In this thread as in the other, your bluster does little to address any real issue. If you want to, and think you can, develop a program that can rival Guelph and keep the Brandon McBrides of the world from going to the NCAA, why don't you just do it? In other words, show, don't tell (and you haven't even told, beyond ranting in general about Guelph).
07/29/2012 6:57:22 PM
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I 100% agree with everything Oldester says but Traveller seriously needs to open his eyes and stop crying about athletes leaving our country in the benefit of themselves. Traveller, stop being so narrow minded and listen to Oldester, please.
I 100% agree with everything Oldester says but Traveller seriously needs to open his eyes and stop crying about athletes leaving our country in the benefit of themselves. Traveller, stop being so narrow minded and listen to Oldester, please.
07/29/2012 10:46:16 PM
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@bomba Lots of good distance coaches around. That hasn't changed.
@bomba

Lots of good distance coaches around. That hasn't changed.
07/30/2012 12:49:48 AM
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Of course, neither I nor anyone else would take a position that says all of our top juniors, or even a majority of them, SHOULD/MUST stay in Canada. In fact, those with an IQ in triple digits will quickly recognize that is diametrically opposed to what I am saying. What I am noting is that Oldster, almost within the same sentence, transitions from saying that McBride should go wherever he feels is best for him, to saying that one must be brain dead to suggest that he might go somewhere other than the NCAA program. And thus, extends his position to insinuate that you really have zero or little chance of success if you choose to stay in Canada to go to school. Perhaps, that is a good approach, if you think you are neiter capable nor interested in developing a National/International program at your school or club. And, as for a lecture from Oldster about the roots of the Guelph program, that is a total fucking joke. I actually defy Oldster to check with DST about where some of his initiatives and programs originate from, and then ask him for my phone number. I will gladly discuss the numbers of athletes I have coached who were Olympians, World Championship team members, Commonwealth team members, National Champions, etc., etc. What I really get upset about is when some who have never "made it" to any significant level, as an athlete or a coach, think they somehow know what we can or cannot do in Canada, and talk as if they really know what they are talking about, and try and influence the conversation with a lot of heat, but little light.
Of course, neither I nor anyone else would take a position that says all of our top juniors, or even a majority of them, SHOULD/MUST stay in Canada. In fact, those with an IQ in triple digits will quickly recognize that is diametrically opposed to what I am saying. What I am noting is that Oldster, almost within the same sentence, transitions from saying that McBride should go wherever he feels is best for him, to saying that one must be brain dead to suggest that he might go somewhere other than the NCAA program. And thus, extends his position to insinuate that you really have zero or little chance of success if you choose to stay in Canada to go to school. Perhaps, that is a good approach, if you think you are neiter capable nor interested in developing a National/International program at your school or club.
And, as for a lecture from Oldster about the roots of the Guelph program, that is a total fucking joke. I actually defy Oldster to check with DST about where some of his initiatives and programs originate from, and then ask him for my phone number. I will gladly discuss the numbers of athletes I have coached who were Olympians, World Championship team members, Commonwealth team members, National Champions, etc., etc.
What I really get upset about is when some who have never "made it" to any significant level, as an athlete or a coach, think they somehow know what we can or cannot do in Canada, and talk as if they really know what they are talking about, and try and influence the conversation with a lot of heat, but little light.
07/30/2012 8:25:57 AM
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Posts: 169
I think this discussion needed to start with the recognition that distance running in Canada today is an order of magnitude better than it was a decade ago. My take on this is that enough people have recognized the value of good hard work, and shed the notion of shortcuts via low volume, frequent high intensity training espoused by some of the prominent western "gurus" in the 80s and 90s. With more people running, well, more, we see results. This year's distance contingent at OGs is huge by comparison with (recent) past years, and that is no accident. Examine what the more successful LD runners have done to get there, and the answer is more or less self-evident. Get more people to follow their example of training with a long term, deliberate approach involving a staple of a lot of running, and less emphasis on fancy shortcuts.
I think this discussion needed to start with the recognition that distance running in Canada today is an order of magnitude better than it was a decade ago. My take on this is that enough people have recognized the value of good hard work, and shed the notion of shortcuts via low volume, frequent high intensity training espoused by some of the prominent western "gurus" in the 80s and 90s. With more people running, well, more, we see results. This year's distance contingent at OGs is huge by comparison with (recent) past years, and that is no accident. Examine what the more successful LD runners have done to get there, and the answer is more or less self-evident. Get more people to follow their example of training with a long term, deliberate approach involving a staple of a lot of running, and less emphasis on fancy shortcuts.

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