SR Nationals?
06/26/2011 2:15:34 PM
User
Joined: Apr 2011
Posts: 22
First off, Ive really enjoyed the coverage of Senior Nationals on this message board, second to none. Secondly, Ive never been to Calgary, but it appears that times were quite a bit slower, is this caused by the altitude? Or weather? How much of a difference does it make?
First off, Ive really enjoyed the coverage of Senior Nationals on this message board, second to none.

Secondly, Ive never been to Calgary, but it appears that times were quite a bit slower, is this caused by the altitude? Or weather? How much of a difference does it make?
06/26/2011 5:49:59 PM
User
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 17
It's at altitude, but isn't it only like 1000m or something? I watched the men's 800 and 1500 on the web, and they were just really slow and tactical from the gun. Was rooting hard for Milne, it was a good race to watch. I am amazed with the lack of activity here though -- it's USA nationals this weekend and letsrun is going nuts. There were more posts about Canadian nationals (one in total) there than here. What is attendance like at the meet?
It's at altitude, but isn't it only like 1000m or something?

I watched the men's 800 and 1500 on the web, and they were just really slow and tactical from the gun. Was rooting hard for Milne, it was a good race to watch.

I am amazed with the lack of activity here though -- it's USA nationals this weekend and letsrun is going nuts. There were more posts about Canadian nationals (one in total) there than here. What is attendance like at the meet?
06/26/2011 7:44:04 PM
User
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 16
It was also fairly cold, only about 17 degrees. They also said there was a strong wind. However it was great to still see Reed out kicking Stellingwerff and Elmore! Along with Brennan with running 52.49!
It was also fairly cold, only about 17 degrees. They also said there was a strong wind.

However it was great to still see Reed out kicking Stellingwerff and Elmore! Along with Brennan with running 52.49!
06/26/2011 7:55:13 PM
User
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 8
@markeroon The altitude? It's almost 4000ft. There were complaints about the venue because of this. Affects some, not others. Every race has it's beast.
@markeroon

The altitude? It's almost 4000ft. There were complaints about the venue because of this. Affects some, not others. Every race has it's beast.
06/26/2011 8:06:31 PM
User
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 17
@Trackula I spoke correctly, according to wikipedia. It is 1048m (3438 ft).
@Trackula I spoke correctly, according to wikipedia. It is 1048m (3438 ft).
06/26/2011 9:06:59 PM
User
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 165
sadly, I am not suprised about the lack of activity that is going on regarding our senior nationals and this is part of the problem why we are not running well on the senior level. the attention open age is getting is very little compared to the joke called U20 track (ofsaa in specific). I recall seeing one post a while back saying how some athletes go downhill after their final ofsaa. if there is any reason for that, just look at the attention NCAA, CIS and CDN Seniors gets to our tnfnorth cummunity compared to ofsaa and BCHS. these kids are thinking about winning ofsaa (or nat. jrs) as their ultimate dream because of exposure and once they're out of HS... USA for example - yes, making HS states is big to the youth, but running D1 is all what about down there and in Webbs case - setting the USA Mile Record. Now regarding the venue, I was disgusted by the way these guys were racing on Saturday (800s and 1500s), but it was an obvious sign that they were all disgusted about Calgary being our world trials venue because of Altitude. Steeple for example, Hughes would have left Genest in the dust had it been a lot closer to sea level (8:25 solo says a lot vs an 8:40 guy) because he needed another B standard to represent Canada at worlds which is within his abilities. did he feel that he could have acheived that standard at mild altitude? Hopefully Hughes, Sheila Reid, Milne and Nate Brannen all get their A standard between now and August. because it would be a huge disappointment for Canada to send only 1 person to worlds in any event 1500m and up (Elmore and thats if she goes)
sadly, I am not suprised about the lack of activity that is going on regarding our senior nationals and this is part of the problem why we are not running well on the senior level. the attention open age is getting is very little compared to the joke called U20 track (ofsaa in specific).

I recall seeing one post a while back saying how some athletes go downhill after their final ofsaa. if there is any reason for that, just look at the attention NCAA, CIS and CDN Seniors gets to our tnfnorth cummunity compared to ofsaa and BCHS. these kids are thinking about winning ofsaa (or nat. jrs) as their ultimate dream because of exposure and once they're out of HS...

USA for example - yes, making HS states is big to the youth, but running D1 is all what about down there and in Webbs case - setting the USA Mile Record.

Now regarding the venue, I was disgusted by the way these guys were racing on Saturday (800s and 1500s), but it was an obvious sign that they were all disgusted about Calgary being our world trials venue because of Altitude. Steeple for example, Hughes would have left Genest in the dust had it been a lot closer to sea level (8:25 solo says a lot vs an 8:40 guy) because he needed another B standard to represent Canada at worlds which is within his abilities. did he feel that he could have acheived that standard at mild altitude?

Hopefully Hughes, Sheila Reid, Milne and Nate Brannen all get their A standard between now and August. because it would be a huge disappointment for Canada to send only 1 person to worlds in any event 1500m and up (Elmore and thats if she goes)
06/26/2011 9:54:35 PM
User
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 17
@ERL_19 I hadn't considered senior development to be an issue, but perhaps you're correct. I'd like to compare the numbers at nats between this year and last year. The LRDS and 401 meets in general have a good level of competition and there seem to be plenty of good collegiate and post-collegiate athletes competing here in Ontario. Even the twilights in Toronto have quality people showing up and competing. It was just strange to me -- it seems like some meets have been pretty hype around here (Southern Ontario) this summer, then nats rolls around and... *crickets*.
@ERL_19 I hadn't considered senior development to be an issue, but perhaps you're correct. I'd like to compare the numbers at nats between this year and last year.

The LRDS and 401 meets in general have a good level of competition and there seem to be plenty of good collegiate and post-collegiate athletes competing here in Ontario. Even the twilights in Toronto have quality people showing up and competing.

It was just strange to me -- it seems like some meets have been pretty hype around here (Southern Ontario) this summer, then nats rolls around and... *crickets*.
06/27/2011 2:07:40 AM
Coach
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 70
[quote=ERL_19] Steeple for example, Hughes would have left Genest in the dust had it been a lot closer to sea level (8:25 solo says a lot vs an 8:40 guy) because he needed another B standard to represent Canada at worlds which is within his abilities. did he feel that he could have acheived that standard at mild altitude?[/quote] @ERL_19 Just for the sake of clarity, Alex is a little better than an 8:40 guy, he has run 8:27.53 in 2009 and has a best this year of 8:33. Altitude or not there were some phenomenal races this weekend, both 1500s despite slow paces were incredibly exciting. The two steeplechase races had great action, the men's in particular was a phenomenal back and forth over the last kilometre. The men's 5000 was a great race with Coolsaet, Wiebe and Hubers duking it out over the last 400 after Coolsaet throwing in numerous surges in the proceeding two kilometres. Probably the race of the weekend might have been the women's 800 with the entire field in contention with 150 metres to go.
ERL_19 wrote:
Steeple for example, Hughes would have left Genest in the dust had it been a lot closer to sea level (8:25 solo says a lot vs an 8:40 guy) because he needed another B standard to represent Canada at worlds which is within his abilities. did he feel that he could have acheived that standard at mild altitude?


@ERL_19 Just for the sake of clarity, Alex is a little better than an 8:40 guy, he has run 8:27.53 in 2009 and has a best this year of 8:33.

Altitude or not there were some phenomenal races this weekend, both 1500s despite slow paces were incredibly exciting. The two steeplechase races had great action, the men's in particular was a phenomenal back and forth over the last kilometre. The men's 5000 was a great race with Coolsaet, Wiebe and Hubers duking it out over the last 400 after Coolsaet throwing in numerous surges in the proceeding two kilometres. Probably the race of the weekend might have been the women's 800 with the entire field in contention with 150 metres to go.
06/27/2011 11:26:58 AM
User
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 17
[quote=ChrisMoulton] Probably the race of the weekend might have been the women's 800 with the entire field in contention with 150 metres to go.[/quote] @ChrisMoulton luckily, this was the only race on saturday cbc decided not to show.....
ChrisMoulton wrote:
Probably the race of the weekend might have been the women's 800 with the entire field in contention with 150 metres to go.


@ChrisMoulton

luckily, this was the only race on saturday cbc decided not to show.....
06/27/2011 2:51:51 PM
User
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 24
[quote=ERL_19] Now regarding the venue, I was disgusted by the way these guys were racing on Saturday (800s and 1500s), but it was an obvious sign that they were all disgusted about Calgary being our world trials venue because of Altitude. Steeple for example, Hughes would have left Genest in the dust had it been a lot closer to sea level (8:25 solo says a lot vs an 8:40 guy) because he needed another B standard to represent Canada at worlds which is within his abilities. did he feel that he could have acheived that standard at mild altitude? [/quote] @ERL_19 I definitely don't agree with your comment on Hughes leaving Genest in his dust, had the race been at sea level. As Moulton pointed out, Genest has run times very close to those of Hughes and (correct me if I'm wrong) has probably had a pretty layed-back track schedule to prepare for the race, while Hughes had to focus on running well and peaking for his NCAA team at the championships. I watched the race and Hughes looked like he was gunning for a fast time and Genest was able to stay close enough to kick by him with a little over a lap remaining. It was a good race and I would say that the better runner won on the day, as they both had to deal with the same conditions. As far as the altitude is concerned, it hurt the distance performances but it would have aided the sprints and throws and, as we all know, "Canada is more of a throwing and sprinting country". In all seriousness though, the 800m and 1500m races are often slow and tactical affairs, whether the races are run at altitude or at sea-level. Look at the race results at the USA champs in the men's 1500m, for example. I agree that it does kind of suck that distance athletes didn't have a legitimate shot at running standard if they wanted to go for it, but I think that the tactical nature of the races in the 800m and 1500m was influenced more by the presence of windy conditions, which can happen at sea level too. The 10k was a complete joke, as Kip and Reid basically jogged 9600m, before Kip showed he had better speed on the last lap and Reid looked fairly content the whole race to just be top Canadian and save himself for the 5k, running his last lap in only 64 sec to run 31:30ish. Fair enough - I'm not criticizing. In my opinion, they should definitely go back to holding the 10k at an earlier date and a venue where fast times can be run. Hopefully that would lead to a more competitive field and would allow more guys to run in both the 5k and 10k championships.
ERL_19 wrote:

Now regarding the venue, I was disgusted by the way these guys were racing on Saturday (800s and 1500s), but it was an obvious sign that they were all disgusted about Calgary being our world trials venue because of Altitude. Steeple for example, Hughes would have left Genest in the dust had it been a lot closer to sea level (8:25 solo says a lot vs an 8:40 guy) because he needed another B standard to represent Canada at worlds which is within his abilities. did he feel that he could have acheived that standard at mild altitude?


@ERL_19

I definitely don't agree with your comment on Hughes leaving Genest in his dust, had the race been at sea level. As Moulton pointed out, Genest has run times very close to those of Hughes and (correct me if I'm wrong) has probably had a pretty layed-back track schedule to prepare for the race, while Hughes had to focus on running well and peaking for his NCAA team at the championships. I watched the race and Hughes looked like he was gunning for a fast time and Genest was able to stay close enough to kick by him with a little over a lap remaining. It was a good race and I would say that the better runner won on the day, as they both had to deal with the same conditions.

As far as the altitude is concerned, it hurt the distance performances but it would have aided the sprints and throws and, as we all know, "Canada is more of a throwing and sprinting country". In all seriousness though, the 800m and 1500m races are often slow and tactical affairs, whether the races are run at altitude or at sea-level. Look at the race results at the USA champs in the men's 1500m, for example. I agree that it does kind of suck that distance athletes didn't have a legitimate shot at running standard if they wanted to go for it, but I think that the tactical nature of the races in the 800m and 1500m was influenced more by the presence of windy conditions, which can happen at sea level too. The 10k was a complete joke, as Kip and Reid basically jogged 9600m, before Kip showed he had better speed on the last lap and Reid looked fairly content the whole race to just be top Canadian and save himself for the 5k, running his last lap in only 64 sec to run 31:30ish. Fair enough - I'm not criticizing. In my opinion, they should definitely go back to holding the 10k at an earlier date and a venue where fast times can be run. Hopefully that would lead to a more competitive field and would allow more guys to run in both the 5k and 10k championships.
06/27/2011 4:26:02 PM
Power User
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 176
Ok maybe someone here can enlighten me. What's with the sit-and-kick strategy in the 1500 final? It is not really to anyone's advantage to do that, yet everyone always does it. Milne and Brennan could have broken the field (except maybe Martinson) with an opening 800 in 1:58 which would not have been that tough for them. Even the guys who had run 3:41-2 are not likely to compete against 3:36 guys top-end speed. It's another level. Meanwhile, any of the 3:40-mid guys in there should know they are not going to out-kick any of those top guys, who have high-end speeds that are beyond what the rest of the field has. So why not take it out in 2:00 and at least then everyone has a shot at running a PB or something.
Ok maybe someone here can enlighten me. What's with the sit-and-kick strategy in the 1500 final? It is not really to anyone's advantage to do that, yet everyone always does it.

Milne and Brennan could have broken the field (except maybe Martinson) with an opening 800 in 1:58 which would not have been that tough for them. Even the guys who had run 3:41-2 are not likely to compete against 3:36 guys top-end speed. It's another level. Meanwhile, any of the 3:40-mid guys in there should know they are not going to out-kick any of those top guys, who have high-end speeds that are beyond what the rest of the field has. So why not take it out in 2:00 and at least then everyone has a shot at running a PB or something.
06/27/2011 5:34:23 PM
User
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 17
@Stingersxc Milne and Brannen raced earlier this year at OXY, and Milne was the only guy in the entire field who tried to go with the pacer (Willis). Brannen (along with Wheating, the eventual winner) ended up catching him right at the line, so Milne probably didn't want a repeat of that performance (i.e. setting a hard pace early and tiring himself out). To be honest, I thought that Milne would win in a kicker's race between the two of them, he must have thought that also, and Brannen must have thought otherwise.
@Stingersxc Milne and Brannen raced earlier this year at OXY, and Milne was the only guy in the entire field who tried to go with the pacer (Willis). Brannen (along with Wheating, the eventual winner) ended up catching him right at the line, so Milne probably didn't want a repeat of that performance (i.e. setting a hard pace early and tiring himself out).

To be honest, I thought that Milne would win in a kicker's race between the two of them, he must have thought that also, and Brannen must have thought otherwise.
06/27/2011 9:34:20 PM
User
Joined: Nov 2010
Posts: 153
@Stingersxc Stringing everyone out sure worked for Bekele http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBIkIIC7CQU *Edit* Best race ever.
@Stingersxc Stringing everyone out sure worked for Bekele

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBIkIIC7CQU

*Edit* Best race ever.
06/27/2011 9:54:27 PM
User
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 349
@markeroon No one wanted to take the lead down the backstretch with a good wind in their face. Therefore there were many slow times. This is a championship meet so nobody wants to be the sacrificial lamb. Two things disappointed me with nationals: 1) The fact that many of the fields were so weak. Many of our good athletes are even attending national champs. I think this is because there is little incentive and not a lot of travelling dollars made available to mid-level athletes in Canada. Many NCAA athletes were not there. Is it also because the National Training Centres have weakened the club system in Canada? Without national level athletes in the clubs, the ability and motivation to sponsor and fund is difficult. Many of our finals and semis were filled with Junior and HS runners. Where are all the Senior athletes? 2) Lack of sharpness in middle distance races: Surely our male 800m and 1500m runners can move a little quicker for the last 200 - 400m in races as slow as this. I was surprised that I didn't see some faster finishes. The women's 1500 (Sheila Reid) was the only really impressive finish - and it was a relatively faster time.
@markeroon
No one wanted to take the lead down the backstretch with a good wind in their face. Therefore there were many slow times. This is a championship meet so nobody wants to be the sacrificial lamb.

Two things disappointed me with nationals:
1) The fact that many of the fields were so weak. Many of our good athletes are even attending national champs. I think this is because there is little incentive and not a lot of travelling dollars made available to mid-level athletes in Canada. Many NCAA athletes were not there. Is it also because the National Training Centres have weakened the club system in Canada? Without national level athletes in the clubs, the ability and motivation to sponsor and fund is difficult. Many of our finals and semis were filled with Junior and HS runners. Where are all the Senior athletes?

2) Lack of sharpness in middle distance races:
Surely our male 800m and 1500m runners can move a little quicker for the last 200 - 400m in races as slow as this. I was surprised that I didn't see some faster finishes. The women's 1500 (Sheila Reid) was the only really impressive finish - and it was a relatively faster time.
06/27/2011 10:38:36 PM
User
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 82
The rest of the country may not want to hear it,but Nationals need to be in Ontario. That would double the size of the fields in many events . But as someone else said, the 10k needs to be separate-late May ideally, so that 10k guys could build up to then and then race shorter distance or build for marathons in the summer.
The rest of the country may not want to hear it,but Nationals need to be in Ontario. That would double the size of the fields in many events . But as someone else said, the 10k needs to be separate-late May ideally, so that 10k guys could build up to then and then race shorter distance or build for marathons in the summer.
06/27/2011 10:44:43 PM
User
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 82
A little more praise for Sheila Reid. She absolutely waxed HS and ME down the stretch. The announcers were blissfully unaware that she was coming, but anyone who followed the ncaas knew who was going to win with 400 to go. Has she got another month or so in her? What a great year.
A little more praise for Sheila Reid. She absolutely waxed HS and ME down the stretch. The announcers were blissfully unaware that she was coming, but anyone who followed the ncaas knew who was going to win with 400 to go.
Has she got another month or so in her? What a great year.
06/27/2011 11:19:18 PM
User
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 11
To be honest, it looked to me like Reid only won by virtue of Elmore going out wide to try and hold HS off. Reid certainly had the kick necessary to win, but if Elmore had stuck to the rail then Reid would have had to go all the way around HS and probably would have run out of real estate. Just my two cents to contribute to a discussion that is (finally) not about OFSAA.
To be honest, it looked to me like Reid only won by virtue of Elmore going out wide to try and hold HS off. Reid certainly had the kick necessary to win, but if Elmore had stuck to the rail then Reid would have had to go all the way around HS and probably would have run out of real estate.

Just my two cents to contribute to a discussion that is (finally) not about OFSAA.
06/28/2011 5:38:12 AM
User
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 8
comment and question... 1) To the comment by Stingersxc above, on why Milne or Brannan just didn't take it out. I have no idea, but at the elite level there are actually so FEW races that are sit and kick. Nearly every single race these guys will go in has a rabbit, that strings out the field. This does not mimic the rounds at the World Championships whatsoever. So, getting a sit and kick tactical experience, better mimics the rounds at a world championship, and I am sure this reasoning comes into things as well. 2) does anyone know where to find video's of the races? Or can someone post a few of the distance races on youtube?
comment and question...

1) To the comment by Stingersxc above, on why Milne or Brannan just didn't take it out. I have no idea, but at the elite level there are actually so FEW races that are sit and kick. Nearly every single race these guys will go in has a rabbit, that strings out the field. This does not mimic the rounds at the World Championships whatsoever. So, getting a sit and kick tactical experience, better mimics the rounds at a world championship, and I am sure this reasoning comes into things as well.

2) does anyone know where to find video's of the races? Or can someone post a few of the distance races on youtube?
06/28/2011 10:37:29 AM
User
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 21
[quote=Stingersxc]Ok maybe someone here can enlighten me. What's with the sit-and-kick strategy in the 1500 final? It is not really to anyone's advantage to do that, yet everyone always does it.[/quote] @Stingersxc The person who wins would probably disagree with you. Obviously worked for them in that particular race.
Stingersxc wrote:
Ok maybe someone here can enlighten me. What's with the sit-and-kick strategy in the 1500 final? It is not really to anyone's advantage to do that, yet everyone always does it.


@Stingersxc
The person who wins would probably disagree with you. Obviously worked for them in that particular race.
06/28/2011 2:03:39 PM
Coach
Joined: May 2010
Posts: 435
Where to begin? [b]This message board[/b]: In spite of the best intentions of Moults and Maloney (and they are sharp guys who continue to offer good content on the top page), this forum has not been embraced the sport community, to put it mildly. A glance at the old board (and it is still up) reveals what a huge and valuable resource was lost with the move from there to here. The old board had a membership in the thousands, with often highly detailed, passionate, and informative threads stretching 14-15 pages, viewed sometimes thousands of times. It was Letsrun, only better in many respects, because the smaller size of community and the membership requirement enforced some accountability. There is a certain amount of bullshit luck-- even magic-- that goes into the creation of something like this (who would ever have thought Letsrun would become what it has? Certainly not it's creators, I'm sure), so I'm not sure what, if anything, can be done about it. And there is no point in blaming the thousands of members who didn't bother to convert their accounts, or who have generally not embraced the new board. Many of them were younger, I suspect, and are gone for good. Meanwhile, talking about Canadian running online is just not a habit that the newer crop of young athletes ever developed, so they are likely lost for good too. The spell has been broken. There is now no one place for runners to have their accomplishments recognized and discussed by their peers-- a big part of why athletes stick it out in this loneliest and most unfashionable of sports. [b]Slow middle distance race[/b]s: I've never gotten this, and I used to race mid-d. You train for months and months to run X-pace/effort, then, when you get to the most important race of the year, you jog for 1200m and sprint(?). For Milne, Brannen, and the top US guys, Nationals was NOT the most important race of the year, so they opted to make it as easy as possible on themselves, and still succeeded. For everyone else, it was a complete waste of time. Most finished about where they would have in a fast race (with the possible exception of the Centrowitz kid), but in a completely meaningless time. And now, for the vast majority of them, their season is over. If they think leading a race is so scary, why don't 2 or three of them get together and agree to make sure the pace is no slower than, say, 60 sec laps for the first km? Do these guys really not know they're going to get their asses kicked no matter what the pace, and that it's better to die trying? They'd certainly learn a little more by going hard, I would argue. Could we perhaps get a representative on here to actually tell us what goes on in the mind of, say, a 3:40-45 guy as he's jogging 66s in a pack alongside of 3:31-35 guys? Because I am mystified. Why not just try to run the pace/effort you trained to run!?
Where to begin?

This message board: In spite of the best intentions of Moults and Maloney (and they are sharp guys who continue to offer good content on the top page), this forum has not been embraced the sport community, to put it mildly. A glance at the old board (and it is still up) reveals what a huge and valuable resource was lost with the move from there to here. The old board had a membership in the thousands, with often highly detailed, passionate, and informative threads stretching 14-15 pages, viewed sometimes thousands of times. It was Letsrun, only better in many respects, because the smaller size of community and the membership requirement enforced some accountability. There is a certain amount of bullshit luck-- even magic-- that goes into the creation of something like this (who would ever have thought Letsrun would become what it has? Certainly not it's creators, I'm sure), so I'm not sure what, if anything, can be done about it. And there is no point in blaming the thousands of members who didn't bother to convert their accounts, or who have generally not embraced the new board. Many of them were younger, I suspect, and are gone for good. Meanwhile, talking about Canadian running online is just not a habit that the newer crop of young athletes ever developed, so they are likely lost for good too. The spell has been broken. There is now no one place for runners to have their accomplishments recognized and discussed by their peers-- a big part of why athletes stick it out in this loneliest and most unfashionable of sports.

Slow middle distance races: I've never gotten this, and I used to race mid-d. You train for months and months to run X-pace/effort, then, when you get to the most important race of the year, you jog for 1200m and sprint(?). For Milne, Brannen, and the top US guys, Nationals was NOT the most important race of the year, so they opted to make it as easy as possible on themselves, and still succeeded. For everyone else, it was a complete waste of time. Most finished about where they would have in a fast race (with the possible exception of the Centrowitz kid), but in a completely meaningless time. And now, for the vast majority of them, their season is over. If they think leading a race is so scary, why don't 2 or three of them get together and agree to make sure the pace is no slower than, say, 60 sec laps for the first km? Do these guys really not know they're going to get their asses kicked no matter what the pace, and that it's better to die trying? They'd certainly learn a little more by going hard, I would argue. Could we perhaps get a representative on here to actually tell us what goes on in the mind of, say, a 3:40-45 guy as he's jogging 66s in a pack alongside of 3:31-35 guys? Because I am mystified. Why not just try to run the pace/effort you trained to run!?

You must be logged in to comment.

Click Here to Log In.